Boston leads No. 1 South Carolina women past Vandy 96-48

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Aliyah Boston had 16 points and 10 rebounds as top-ranked South Carolina dominated Vanderbilt 96-48 Thursday night for the Gamecocks’ 25th straight victory.

With her fourth straight double-double and 12th this season, the reigning AP national player of the year matched the program record of 72 sets by Sheila Foster between 1979 and 1982. Boston hit all eight of her shots while playing 22 minutes.

South Carolina (19-0, 7-0 Southeastern Conference) evened up the all-time series at 21 with the Gamecocks’ 15th straight victory, including seven straight at Memorial Gymnasium.

Aunt Cooke led South Carolina with 17 points, and Kamilla Cardoso had 10 points and 15 rebounds.

Marnelle Garraud led Vanderbilt (9-11, 0-6) with 15 points.

NO. 2 OHIO STATE 84, NORTHWESTERN 54

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Taylor Mikesell and Rebeka Mikulasikova each scored 18 points and Ohio State beat Northwestern to push its program-best, season-opening winning streak to 19 games.

The Buckeyes (19-0, 8-0 Big Ten) led wire to wire and closed the first quarter on a 10-1 run, with eight of the points from Mikesell. Ohio State didn’t allow Northwestern (6-12, 0-8) to come closer than nine points after the first two minutes of the second quarter.

Paige Mott scored a career-high 16 points for Northwestern. Caroline Lau added 13 points.

NO. 7 NOTRE DAME 57, CLEMSON 54

CLEMSON, SC (AP) — Olivia Miles scored 20 points and Maddy Westbeld had 15, including a layup that put Notre Dame ahead for good against Clemson.

The Fighting Irish (15-2, 6-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) held on despite scoring 31 fewer points than their 88.1 average per game coming in. Notre Dame’s defense forced eight turnovers by Clemson (12-8, 3-5) in the final period.

Brie Perpingnan led Clemson with 11 points. Amari Robinson, the Tigers’ top scorer, was held to eight on 4-of-10 shooting.

NO. 11 MARYLAND 77, WISCONSIN 64

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Shyanne Sellers scored 13 points in the first quarter and matched a career best with 21 points as Maryland cruised past Wisconsin.

Diamond Miller added 19 points for Maryland (15-4, 6-2 Big Ten), which has won eight of its last nine games and all 12 games in the series with Wisconsin.

Avery LaBarbera scored 16 points and made four 3-pointers for Wisconsin (6-13, 2-6).

NO. 12 VIRGINIA TECH 69, PITTSBURGH 62

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Georgia Amoore scored 16 of her 21 points in the second half and Virginia Tech held off Pittsburgh.

Elizabeth Kitley and Kayana Traylor had 13 points apiece and Taylor Soule scored 12 for Virginia Tech (15-3, 5-3 Atlantic Coast Conference). Kitley had 13 rebounds and Soule had 11.

Amber Brown had 17 points and eight rebounds for Pitt (7-11, 0-7), which has lost six straight. Maliyah Johnson added 13.

NO. 16 GONZAGA 81, PACIFIC 78

STOCKTON, Calif. (AP) — Yvonne Ejim had 22 points and 12 rebounds, McKayla Williams added 19 points and seven boards and Gonzaga held off Pacific.

Gonzaga led for 39 minutes, 18 seconds, with an advantage as high as 16 points. But Pacific scored 30 points in the fourth quarter to make it close down the stretch. Liz Smith made five 3-pointers and scored 21 points for Pacific (7-12, 2-6 West Coast Conference).

Kaylynne Truong finished with 14 points, six rebounds and seven assists for Gonzaga (18-2, 8-0), which has won 13 in a row against the Tigers.

NO. 20 NORTH CAROLINA STATE 71, MIAMI 61

RALEIGH, NC (AP) — Saniya Rivers scored 14 points, Mimi Collins and Camille Hobby each added 11 and North Carolina State beat Miami.

Aziaha James added 10 points for NC State (14-5, 4-4 Atlantic Coast Conference). River Baldwin played just 12 minutes after suffering an injury in the first half.

Lola Pendande scored 21 points and Haley Cavinder added 15 for Miami (12-7, 5-3).

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AP women’s college basketball: https://apnews.com/hub/womens-college-basketball and https://apnews.com/hub/ap-top-25-womens-college-basketball-poll and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

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